Posts Tagged ‘Geomancy’

Machu Picchu’s Face

17/08/2009

By Randall Richards

"The Face" peering over Machu Picchu

"The Face" peering over Machu Picchu

I’ve been to Machu Picchu for over ten years, and I’ve heard tell of “the face on Huayna Picchu Mountain” for years. I have been able to pick out the stylized puma face that everyone talks about,  with its ears and eyes, but the other day, human face  jumped out at me as I looked at these images I’d taken,  from the classic view on the sloping rock just above Machu Picchu. When I was looking through my images of the day, I clearly saw the face of an older man, wearing a “chulla” or Peruvian hat with ear flaps, as he looks over the Machu Picchu Citadel.

Details of Huayna Picchu's Face

Details of Huayna Picchu's Face

I’d recently run across an “optical illusion” website that features the profile of an Inka man looking skyward, shown by a profile of the ridge from the ruins to Huayna Picchu Mountain, but after close examination of the ridgeline in the website’s images, and comparing them to ridgeline in my images, there is clearly some Photoshop imagery going on.  A Peruvian author has used the profile on the cover of his book. I even walked by a hotel here in Cusco the other day which is using a drawing of “the profile” for its logo.  The profile, whether Photoshop enhanced or not, is still a stretch, any way you look at it,  and may not be the real face that has been hidden in plain sight all along.

Back to the face that I’ve observed. It clearly has eyes, a nose mouth, chin and whole face, at least in my mind’s eye. (Let me know if you see it too). The second image at right  is a blow up of the image with my text and pointer lines inserted. A word about Photoshop: these images are un-retouched. Take any other image from the same location, at late afternoon during the southern winter, and you’ll get the same results.

Every time I see an image of Machu Picchu from that angle, the face now jumps out at me. I am interested in hearing your comments or experiences when visiting Machu Picchu. Do you see the face?

KareKare and Piha: Powerful Places

09/06/2009

The Power of Place – Two Black Sand Beaches near Auckland Exude Energy and Ayni*

The Big Easy

The Big Easy

I went for a gander at KareKare beach near our base here in Piha Beach the other day. One reads about deserted beaches that run for miles, and I know I’ve only just gotten a taste of New Zealand’s remote beaches, but I have to write about this place. I’m just settling in to what less population density feels like.

New Zealand  is a country of about 5 million, and Auckland, New Zealand’s largest city,  which is about 25km away, has a population of about 2 million.  By the looks of KareKare Beach, (or the beach village of Piha for that matter) you’d never know we’re near Auckland .   Both KareKare and Piha beach are little hideaways of spirit power spots. One feels the earth energy on the order of Sedona. The power of place exudes from both Piha and Kare Kare.

KareKare Powerspot

KareKare Powerspot

From studying geomancy ( the natural order and patterns of landscape and geography) and natural “Apus” or mountain spirits, my experience and feelings tell me this is one hot spot.  Both Piha and KareKare beaches exhibit rock peaks that protrude directly out of the beaches.

In Piha there exist dramatic caves at the beach’s north end. We got married in front of one last weekend which had two large caves ascending like hallways from the earth. The one on the right is 20-25 feet tall with floors of soft fine sand. The entrances of the two “hallways” are separated at the cliff’s face by a  high wall of about 5 meters wide by 8 meters high, which extends up to roof which forms an alcove.

Roughly in the center of this wall  is a block of lighter denser lava, which appears to have been formed by columnar jointing, but is a single large piece,  protruding out of the surrounding darker rock by 12 inches. It looks like a natural alter, at chest level, facing out to the Tasman Sea. The whole alcove sits about 6 meters above the beach below, and one ascends a huge pile of fine black sand, who’s top forms the uneven sandy floor of the alcove.

Piha Beach-Village

Piha Beach-Village

In Peruvian cosmology the Pacha Mama exhibits mountain or earth spirits in masculine or feminine. In the east, Yin signifies, female, yielding,  yang signifies  active, positive, male, strong. Piha is obviously a powerful place, not only because of its beauty, but  because of the balance in it’s natural layout, between the positive male peak and the female aspect, the caves, not more than a kilometer away.

KareKare Beach exudes power, and solitude.  The movie “The Piano” was made here. The wide black sand beach goes on for miles, with cliffs to the back, broad undulating dunes and a narrow little path from the hamlet of KareKare, which deposits you to the beach.

Mayor  Bob Harvey was asked on a NZ website about his relationship with this area. Says Harvey, “I’ve been the lifeguard here for 50 years. I think there’s a huge spiritual significance here that I reckon on this coastline from Karekare to Whatipu.”  He adds, “Something exists which I…. I can’t put my, my finger on it.”

Peace for two at KareKare

Peace for two at KareKare

The words “The Big Easy” keep coming to mind. I suppose, because it seems easy to be here, easy to reconnect with yourself and nature.  These words, in America have a different connotation –  of New Orleans and all the shenanagins that go with the annual Madigras celebration. But here in KareKare, they are the words  that seem to fit for me.  A place where you can unwind and connect. The place speaks to you. And you are rejuvenated.

*Ayni: A Quechua term meaning ‘reciprocity’ whereby one recieves power from the Apus, or mountain spirits, and one gives power back by offerings and meditation. Reciprocity is a concept that pervades the Quechua way of thinking, and of life  in the Andes.