Posts Tagged ‘Music’

Kirtana Performs 1st Time on New Zealand’s South Island

08/02/2015

Kirtana photo for Art of HealingMountain Spirit near Wanaka, will be hosting Kirtana, a California-based singer/songwriter will be who performs at events with speakers such as Eckhart Tolle, Gangaji and Geneen Roth. She comes to the South Island for the first time to share her contemporary, sacred songs. She will be performing at St. Columba’s Anglican Church on Sunday, 12th, April from 3:00pm-5:00pm in Wanaka

Described as a ‘brilliant poet, marvelous songwriter and accomplished guitarist’, Kirtana best describes both her music and her purpose in sharing it is to “celebrate divine love and the truth of who we are.”

Randall and Amanda Richards, of Mountain Spirit, the newly created retreat centre, say, “We’re really excited to have Cover unseen graceKirtana come to the South Island and share her music with us. It will be our first event. We’re still working on infrastructure  on our land and permitting for other programs, so we were not quite open to host the event on-site.  So when the Anglican Church agreed to have the event at their church, we knew it would be a great venue.”

Kirtana says she is thrilled to have the opportunity to share her music and divine exploration in concert with Kiwis. She will be performing songs from her newest CD “Unseen Grace”

Says Onethemagazine.com, “Kirtana has become one of the most highly sought after modern-day minstrels of non-dual awakening. Her voice and lyrics reach with vulnerable longing for the heart of God, while at the same time transmitting the discovery of that, the opening to that, and the final consummation within it.”

Kirtana bwTickets are $30 in advance, ($35 on the day). With a “Group of 5 offer” at $125 and can be purchased over the phone at Mountain Spirit 03-443-5669 or online at Eventafinda.co.nz  For more information call 03-443-5669 or go to the event webpage at mtnspirit.co.nz

12 REGLAS Para Tocar en una Banda

28/04/2014
Band Chimu Inka,  Cusco, Circa 2003

Banda Chimu Inka, Cusco, Circa 2003

1 . Cada uno debe desempeñar la misma pieza .
2. Observar los signos de repetición sólo si lo que acabas de jugar era interesante.
3. Si toca una nota equivocada , mirar a uno de los otros jugadores.
4. La nota correcta , en el momento equivocado , es una nota falsa . ( Y viceversa ).
5. Una nota equivocada , jugó tímidamente , es una nota falsa .
6. Una nota equivocada , interpretada con autoridad, no es más que tu interpretación de la frase .7. Si todo el mundo se perdió, sino que , seguir los que se pierden .
8. Esfuércese siempre para jugar el máximo notas por segundo. Esto intimidará los jugadores más débiles y que ganar la admiración de los ignorantes.
9. Las marcas de ligaduras , dinámica y alteraciones deben ser completamente ignorados. Ellos están allí sólo para poner el mirar más complicado.
10. Si un pasaje es difícil , más despacio. Si es fácil , acelerar . Todo va a igualar a sí misma en el final.
11. Has logrado una verdadera interpretación cuando , al final, no has jugado una nota de la pieza original.
12. Cuando todo el mundo se detiene la reproducción, usted debe parar también . No juegues las notas que pueden haber dejado de nuevo.

New Zealand Singer Loving Life on the Road in N. America

08/09/2013

By Lucy Ibbotson
Otago Daily Times

Van Riel On Tour in Bodie California

Van Riel in Bodie California

Lake Hawea, New Zealand singer-songwriter Anna van Riel, between gigs on her sustainable house concert tour across North America, plays with daughter Matilda (2) in Bodie, a ghost town in California.

Two-thirds of the way through her sustainable musical road-trip across Canada and the United States, Lake Hawea, NZ singer-songwriter Anna van Riel says the 15 months spent planning and fundraising for the experience has all been worth it.

”I’m still pinching myself,” Ms van Riel told the Otago Daily Times in an email from Colorado.
”I can’t believe we did it. That we’re here. It’s been so much cooler than I anticipated.”

Accompanied by husband Locky Urquhart and their daughter Matilda (2), Ms van Riel has spent the past two months travelling from British Columbia, through Washington State, Oregon, California, Nevada, Utah and Colorado, performing quirky concerts in private homes, farmers markets, trailer parks and other venues.

This week, the trio have been camping at Read the rest of this story at Otago Daily Times…
lucy.ibbotson@odt.co.nz

Taking Time to Enjoy Life..And Music

18/02/2012

A concert, but do you have the time to listen?

I play music professionally, and I too have noticed that the only population that really is open, I mean REALLY open to the music are the little kids. They stop,  stare, dance and get enthralled, no matter where, or who’s watching, or even what music it might be..

A man sat at a metro station in Washington DC and started to play the violin; it was a cold January morning. He played six Bach pieces for about 45 minutes. During that time, since it was rush hour, it was calculated that 1,100 people went through the station, most of them on their way to work.

Three minutes went by, and a middle aged man noticed there was musician playing. He slowed his pace, and stopped for a few seconds, and then hurried up to meet his schedule.

A minute later, the violinist received his first dollar tip: a woman threw the money in the till and without stopping, and continued to walk.

A few minutes later, someone leaned against the wall to listen to him, but the man looked at his watch and started to walk again. Clearly he was late for work.

The one who paid the most attention was a 3 year old boy. His mother tagged him along, hurried, but the kid stopped to look at the violinist. Finally, the mother pushed hard, and the child continued to walk, turning his head all the time. This action was repeated by several other children. All the parents, without exception, forced them to move on.

In the 45 minutes the musician played, only 6 people stopped and stayed for a while. About 20 gave him money, but continued to walk their normal pace. He collected $32. When he finished playing and silence took over, no one noticed it. No one applauded, nor was there any recognition.

No one knew this, but the violinist was Joshua Bell, one of the most talented musicians in the world. He had just played one of the most intricate pieces ever written, on a violin worth $3.5 million dollars.

Two days before his playing in the subway, Joshua Bell sold out at a theater in Boston where the seats averaged $100.

This is a real story. Joshua Bell playing incognito in the metro station was organized by the Washington Post as part of a social experiment about perception, taste, and priorities of people. The outlines were: in a commonplace environment at an inappropriate hour: Do we perceive beauty? Do we stop to appreciate it? Do we recognize the talent in an unexpected context?

One of the possible conclusions from this experience could be:

If we do not have a moment to stop and listen to one of the best musicians in the world playing the best music ever written, how many other things are we missing?

Thanks to Mills Chapman for the post

R. Richards Onstage #2

23/03/2010

Mountain Spirit Institute’s founder and director was on stage last month at the Sunapee Community CoffeeHouse in Sunapee, NH, where he performed for an evening of solo piano, original folk songs, a bit of Zampona and Native American flute. You can learn more about his music and background at his webpage on MSI’s website. Here he sings a version of Life Imitates Art from a CD by Three Track Mind of Seattle, possibly written by Kevin Jones.

R. Richards Onstage

23/03/2010

Richards to Play at CoffeeHouse

16/02/2010

Randy Richards, founder of the Sunapee Community CoffeeHouse returns on February 19th
Sunapee, NH, USA

R. Richards

Singer songwriter Randy Richards returns to the Sunapee Community CoffeeHouse on February 19th at 7PM. Richards will play two different sets, one on guitar and the second on piano. Piano is his first instrument, which he learned as a child, and started playing professionally at age twenty-one in Austria. However, says Richards of his guitar playing, “I had advice when working in France, from the lead singer of The Rascals – to write music on something other than my first instrument.” He adds, “After years of playing guitar, (since college) I finally feel as comfortable on the guitar as on the piano”. He will also be playing a bit of Native American flute and a Zampona from Peru. (more…)

Why We Need Live Music #4

21/01/2010

Another Study Proves It – Live Music: Definitely good for the soul.
By Randall Richards
Images:
Mike Heffernan

Fat Hands, creating good vibes, L to R: Walt Kutylowski, Gerry Putnam, Dana Flewelling, and Nic Kutylowski

OK .  It wasn’t an official *scientific study, but ask anyone who was there, at Gerry Putnam’s CedarHouse Sound & Mastering recording studio when he hosted his annual music get-together, and they’ll tell you – Their souls felt better after having been there – both musicians and listeners alike.  This year, I had the good fortune of being a listener. We had missed most of the day’s party which had started mid-morning, but we certainly weren’t short-changed for music.
The party has been the brainchild of Gerry and recording artist Kathy Lowe as a vehicle to showcase Gerry’s studio for potential recording artists, and to thank past artists who had already done an album (or two, or three) at this heavenly studio, complete with a concert grand Steinway piano, and Gerry’s masterful abilities to engineer top quality albums.
As the night wore on, and most of the day’s musicians had headed home, brothers Walt and Nick Kutylowski, also known as “Fat Hands” sat down and started to do a few numbers unplugged. (The day is usually fully “plugged in”). Then, Putnam pulled up a chair and started picking his classical guitar. Gerry not only recorded and mastered Fat Hands’  two albums at Cedarhouse, but ended up playing lead guitar on them as well. Enter drummer extraordinaire Dana Flewelling, (from Night Kitchen) who usually has a whole “trap set”  in front of him.  He  sat down with a djembe and a set of brushes.

Small but appreciative audience

My wife Amanda and I, Walt Kutylowski’s partner Christy, Mike Heffernan and Kathy Lowe were all that remained of the audience. The rest of  the party-goers had all headed home in the cold night air.

The music and energy that happened was nothing short of way cool.  They must have played for an hour or more, and we, the privileged few,  just sat there taking it in.

Fathands has a few upcoming **gigs but  we’re threatening to kidnap them and take them to New Zealand the next time we head down under, and from the sound of it, they might be willing go.  Meanwhile, we (at Mountain Spirit Institute) will most likely be offering to put on  a house concert or local venue concert for these guys if they’re up for it. They deserve to be heard. Check out Fathands, and Gerry Putnam’s Cedarhouse Sound and Mastering through the links above.
* This is a scientific study about the healing power or music, by the BBC.
** Deerfield CoffeeHouse, NH,  April 10 2010, with Gerry Putnam & Kent Allyn
Musterfield Farm, New London, NH USA June 19th, 2010
Thanks to Mike Heffernan for getting his camera out to capture the moment.

Nice Place, Vermont

29/10/2009

Cody Michaels Seen in Vermont,
I’m not too sure how long I’ll get away with this post. As soon as Cody finds out, he’ll probably make me pull it.
Nevertheless, solo pianist Cody Michaels is a hoot. I’ve known him for over twenty years. We first met ice climbing in North Cornflakes, New Hampshire.
He’s a funny guy, and I’ve always thought he’d be great on either radio or snippets such as this, and wanted to get him on tape doing interviews on various social observations. Give it go, and maybe we can convince him to do a bit more.

Prajna, The Best Knowledge – Great Minds Think Differently

22/11/2008

Just another day at the office, living history on election day.  Talk about “Being The Change”. 

For a look into some really great minds, I like to explore the TED talks, a rich source of inspiration into the areas that make our world go ’round of Technology, Entertainment and Design, recorded every year in sunny, brainy California.  Check out this one by Austrian artist, Stefan Sagmeister.  Just hearing the name of the country reminds me of a slower, more peaceful, more connected to each other way of life.

And a moving story from brain researcher Jill Bolte – her remarkable account of observing the process of watching her brain shut down while having a stroke, and how the brain works…not for the squeamish!

And one of my favorites, a charismatic delivery about the power of classical music, Benjamin Zander, with other messages thrown in to challenge our perceptions of music’s connection to our humanity.